From a Master’s thesis, The scientific revolution’s axiomatic rejection of magical thinking : the case of astrology in England (1600-1700):

Over the course of the next three centuries the Church would actually fluctuate between policies of toleration and persecution of astrologers though, with some Church leaders even taking an avid interest in astrology.

For instance, despite the widespread assault on witchcraft and magic brought about by the Protestant Reformation, and the strong anti-astrology stance taken by Protestant leaders like Luther, Calvin, and Zwingli, we have the example of Phillip Melancthon, who, as dedicated as he was to Luther’s ideals for Church reform, never renounced his belief in a valid and divinely sanctioned science of astrology.

He was able not only to maintain his devout faith in Christianity, but could combine it with a decidedly judicial view of astrology:

“What is true discipline except the ruling of life, but this is impossible if the distant causes are unknown. This divining art is manifestly necessary to the conduct of life, for it shows what one’s natural inclinations are and allows one to exercise one’s good qualities and bridle one’s vicious instincts.”

The scientific revolution’s axiomatic rejection of magical thinking : the case of astrology in England (1600-1700)
Kemp, David (2003) The scientific revolution’s axiomatic rejection of magical thinking : the case of astrology in England (1600-1700). Masters thesis, Concordia University.

Pasted from <http://spectrum.library.concordia.ca/2327/>