Seven Vices and Seven Virtues (Wrath)

Seven Vices and Seven Virtues (Wrath)
Frescoes by GIOTTO



The Seven Vices: Wrath
Fresco, 120 x 55 cm
Cappella Scrovegni (Arena Chapel), Padua

Pasted from <http://www.wga.hu/html/g/giotto/padova/7vicevir/index.html>


An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish

An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish
by Bertrand Russell

Pasted from <http://www.personal.kent.edu/~rmuhamma/Philosophy/RBwritings/outIntellectRubbish.htm>

…Although there are many kinds of sin, seven of which are deadly, the most fruitful field for Satan’s wiles is sex.

The orthodox Catholic doctrine on this subject is to be found in St. Paul, St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas. It is best to be celibate, but those who have not the gift of continence may marry. Intercourse in marriage is not sin, provided it is motivated by desire for offspring. All intercourse outside marriage is sin, and so is intercourse within marriage if any measures are adopted to prevent conception.

Interruption of pregnancy is sin, even if, in medical opinion, it is the only way of saving the mother’s life; for medical opinion is fallible, and God can always save a life by miracle if He sees fit. (This view is embodied in the law of Connecticut.)

Venereal disease is God’s punishment for sin. It is true that, through a guilty husband, this punishment may fall on an innocent woman and her children, but this is a mysterious dispensation of Providence, which it would be impious to question. We must also not inquire why venereal disease was not divinely instituted until the time of Columbus. Since it is the appointed penalty for sin, all measures for its avoidance are also sin-except, of course, a virtuous life.

Marriage is nominally indissoluble, but many people who seem to be married are not. In the case of influential Catholics, some ground for nullity can often be found, but for the poor there is no such outlet, except perhaps in cases of impotence. Persons who divorce and remarry are guilty of adultery in the sight of God. …

Mary Magdalene was not a prostitute….

Mary Magdalene was not a prostitute.

Mary Magdalene was not a prostitute. She is often confused with a different, unnamed woman in the Gospel of Luke (immediately before Mary Magdalene’s introduction) who indeed was a prostitute. The misconception stems from a 6th-century homily from Pope Gregory I, who assumed that the seven demons that Jesus cast out of Mary Magdalene corresponded to the still-nascent concept of the seven deadly sins.[321]

Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misconceptions#Human_body_and_health>

After this…

After this, the spirit Mephostophiles came to him and said unto him: If thou are henceforth steadfast in thy commitment, then will I tickle thy lust otherwise, so that in thy days thou wilt wish naught else than this–namely: if thou canst not live chastely, then will I lead to thy bed any day or night whatever woman thou seest in this city or elsewhere. Whosoever might please
thy lust, and whomever thou might desire in lechery, she shall abide with thee in such a figure and form.
Doctor Faustus was so intrigued by this that his heart trembled with joys and his original proposal rued him. And he did then come into such libidinousness and debauchery that he yearned day and night after the figure of the beautiful women in such excellent forms, dissipating today with one devil and having another on his mind tomorrow.

Pasted from <http://lettersfromthedustbowl.com/Fbk1.html>

Puffed up with pride and arrogance…

Puffed up with pride and arrogance, Doctor Faustus (although he did consider for a space) had got so proud and reckless that he did not want to give thought to the weal of his soul, but came to terms with the evil spirit, promised to observe all his articles, and to obey them. He supposed that the Devil might not be so black as they use to paint him, nor Hell so hot as the people say.

Pasted from <http://lettersfromthedustbowl.com/Fbk1.html>

Sin in America

Sin in America

From the text: “The authors undertook the task of statistically representing the seven deadly sins throughout the U.S. and Nevada to determine what, if any, spatial coincidence occurred. Each of the deadly sins was given separate treatment based on sociologic and economic characteristics, while pride, the “greatest” and “root” of all sins, was determined to be the aggregation of each sin. This work represents one of two separate but related works that are meant to be enjoyed consecutively (gluttony).”




Pasted from <http://hazardgeographer.com/7_Deadly_Sins.html>

-Or-

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/gnxp/2009/05/Maps-of-Seven-Deadly-Sins-in-America/

Doctor Faustus is based on an older tale; it is

Doctor Faustus is based on an older tale; it is believed to be the first dramatization of the Faust legend.

Some scholars believe that Marlowe developed the story from a popular 1592 translation, commonly called The English Faust Book. There is an official 1528 Ingolstadt municipal reference to a “suspicious” Doctor Faustus. There is thought to have been an earlier, lost, German edition of 1587, which itself may have been influenced by even earlier, equally unpreserved pamphlets in Latin, such as those that likely inspired Jacob Bidermann’s treatment of the damnation of the doctor of Paris, Cenodoxus (1602).

Whatever the inspiration, the development of Marlowe’s play is very faithful to the Faust Book especially in the way it mixes comedy with tragedy. However, Marlowe also introduced some changes to make it more original. Here, he made three main additions in the play:

Faustus’ soliloquy in the Act 1 on the vanity of human science
Good and Bad Angels
substitution of Seven Deadly Sins for a pageant of Devils

Apart from these changes, he emphasized his intellectual aspirations and curiosity and minimized the vices in the character of Faustus to lend a Renaissance aura to the story.

Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tragical_History_of_Doctor_Faustus>

Sins in the Bible

Sins in the Bible

Colossians 3:8

But now you must also rid yourselves of all such things as these: anger, rage, malice, slander, and filthy language from your lips.
Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=colossians%203:8&version=NIV>


Mark 4:18-19 (Lust)
Still others, like seed sown among thorns, hear the word; but the worries of this life, the deceitfulness of wealth and the desires for other things come in and choke the word, making it unfruitful.

Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=mark%204:18-19&version=NIV>



Luke 14:11 (Vanity/Self-rightousness)
For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.

Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=luke%2014:11&version=NIV>

And:

Philippians 2:3-11 (Vanity/Self-rightousness)
Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not
looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.
In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus:
Who, being in very nature God,
did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage;
rather, he made himself nothing
by taking the very nature of a servant,
being made in human likeness.
And being found in appearance as a man,
he humbled himself
by becoming obedient to death—
even death on a cross!
Therefore God exalted him to the highest place
and gave him the name that is above every name,
that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow,
in heaven and on earth and under the earth,
and every tongue acknowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father.

Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=philippians%202:3-11&version=NIV>


Luke 18:9-14 (Vanity/Self-rightousness)
The Parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector
To some who were confident of their own righteousness and looked down on everyone else, Jesus told this parable: “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood by himself and prayed: ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people—robbers, evildoers, adulterers—or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week and give a tenth of all I get.’
“But the tax collector stood at a distance. He would not even look up to heaven, but beat his breast and said, ‘God, have mercy on me, a sinner.’
“I tell you that this man, rather than the other, went home justified before God. For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.”

Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=luke%2018:9-14&version=NIV>


Matthew 5:22-24 (Wrath)
But I tell you that anyone who is angry with a brother or sister will be subject to judgment. Again, anyone who says to a brother or sister, ‘Raca,’[Aramaic term of contempt] is answerable to the court. And anyone who says, ‘You fool!’ will be in danger of the fire of hell.
“Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to them; then come and offer your gift.

Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=matthew%205:22-24&version=NIV>


Mark 7:21-23 (Covetousness)
For it is from within, out of a person’s heart, that evil thoughts come—sexual immorality, theft, murder, adultery, greed, malice, deceit, lewdness, envy, slander, arrogance and folly. All these evils come from inside and defile a person.”
Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=mark%207:21-23&version=NIV>


1 Timothy 6:7-12 (Greed)
For we brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it. But if we have food and clothing, we will be content with that. Those who want to get rich fall into temptation and a trap and into many foolish and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil. Some people, eager for money, have wandered from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs.
Final Charge to Timothy
But you, man of God, flee from all this, and pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, endurance and gentleness. Fight the good fight of the faith. Take hold of the eternal life to which you were called when you made your good confession in the presence of many witnesses.

Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1timothy%206:7-12&version=NIV>

Also:

Luke 12:15-31 (Greed)

Then he said to them, “Watch out! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed; life does not consist in an abundance of possessions.”
And he told them this parable: “The ground of a certain rich man yielded an abundant harvest. He thought to himself, ‘What shall I do? I have no place to store my crops.’
“Then he said, ‘This is what I’ll do. I will tear down my barns and build bigger ones, and there I will store my surplus grain. And I’ll say to myself, “You have plenty of grain laid up for many years. Take life easy; eat, drink and be merry.”’
“But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life will be demanded from you. Then who will get what you have prepared for yourself?’
“This is how it will be with whoever stores up things for themselves but is not rich toward God.”

Do Not Worry
Then Jesus said to his disciples: “Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat; or about your body, what you will wear. For life is more than food, and the body more than clothes. Consider the ravens: They do not sow or reap, they have no storeroom or barn; yet God feeds them. And how much more valuable you are than birds! Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to your life? Since you cannot do this very little thing, why do you worry about the rest?
“Consider how the wild flowers grow. They do not labor or spin. Yet I tell you, not even Solomon in all his splendor was dressed like one of these. If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today, and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, how much more will he clothe you—you of little faith! And do not set your heart on what you will eat or drink; do not worry about it. For the pagan world runs after all such things, and your Father knows that you need them. But seek his kingdom, and these things will be given to you as well.


Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=luke%2012:15-31&version=NIV>


Matthew 7:1-5 (Judgement)
Matthew 7
Judging Others

“Do not judge, or you too will be judged. For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.
“Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye? How can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when all the time there is a plank in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye.

Pasted from <http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=matthew%207:1-5&version=NIV>