Where does the name Mephisto/Mephistopheles (Mephistophilus, Mephistophilis, Mephostopheles, Mephastophilis and etc.) come from?

It’s an invented name appearing in the first known chapbook. He is not the Devil (Satan/Lucifer).

-In the sixteenth century chapbooks, his name was Mephostophiles.

-In the first English translation by P. F. (Gent.), he is Mephistophilis.

-In Marlowe’s play, he is Mephastophilis in the first printed “A” version of his play (1604), but
Mephostophilis in the second “B” (1616):

The name of Faustus’s constant diabolical companion, inconsistently rendered in the original texts and in many modern editions ( ‘Mephastophilis’ generally in the A-text, ‘Mephostophilis’ in the B-text, but also ‘Mephastophilus’, etc.) should, in our view, be modernised to the standard dictionary form, ‘Mephistopheles’.
(Bevington, David M; Rasmussen, Eric (1962). Doctor Faustus A- and B- texts (1604, 1616): Christopher Marlowe and his collaborator and revisers. Manchester, England: Manchester University Press. p. xi. ISBN 0-7190-1643-6.)

And then:

“Cast no more doubts. Come, Mephistophilis,
And bring glad tidings from great Lucifer ;
Is’t not midnight? come, Mephistophilus,
Veni, veni, Mephistophile ! “

(Pasted from <http://archive.org/stream/tragicalhistoryofdoc00marluoft/tragicalhistoryofdoc00marluoft_djvu.txt> )

In Goethe’s Faust, he is called Mephistopheles. Klaus Mann used “Mephisto.”

His friends call him “Mephisto;” As in: “Hey! Mephisto!” His wife calls him “Muffy.”

According to Wikipedia (2014):

‘The word may derive from the Hebrew mephitz, meaning “distributor”, and tophel, meaning “liar”;
“tophel” is short for tophel shequer, the literal translation of which is “falsehood plasterer”.[1] The name
can also be a combination of three Greek words: “me” as a negation, “phos” meaning light, and “philis”
meaning loving, making it mean “not-light-loving”, possibly parodying the Latin “Lucifer” or “light-
bearer”.’

Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mephistopheles>