Mephistopheles and Christianity

Mephistopheles and Christianity

“It should be noted that the name Mephistopheles is used by some people to refer to the Devil, but it is a mere folkloric custom, and has nothing to do with Christian demonology and Christian tradition. Prince of Darkness and Lord of Darkness are also folkloric names, although they tend to be incorporated to Christian tradition.”

Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_teaching_about_the_Devil>

More Tony Kline on Mephistopheles

More Tony Kline on Mephistopheles

“(Goethe’s) Faust turns away from unnatural learning, and from the pursuit of intellectual Truth. Rejected by the overpowering Earth-Spirit, he makes his pact with Mephistopheles. Mephisto will provoke him to activity in order to find what will content Faust, and make him desire the Moment to continue, winning the wager if Faust finds that contentment. Mephisto is therefore, as the Creative Spirit, God, proclaims, the agent planted on Earth within man to stir him to activity, and as Mephisto himself says forces him to work the good while attempting to work evil. “

Pasted from <http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/German/TheRestlessSpiritPartII.htm>

More More Tony Kline on Mephistopheles

More More Tony Kline on Mephistopheles

“Worded as it is, the pact makes Mephistopheles the agent of finding Faust a reason to rest, without which he, Mephistopheles, could not win, and yet his true role is the opposite, to make sure Faust never rests. “

Pasted from <http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/German/TheRestlessSpiritPartII.htm>

Tony Kline on Mephistopheles

Tony Kline on Mephistopheles

“Mephistopheles can be regarded legitimately as that aspect of Faust that denies: the aspect that undermines human activity, and declares it worthless, since the results of all human effort are doomed to vanish. Gretchen, Galatea, Helen, and the Virgin represent the aspect of Faust that aspires and is drawn towards the higher. God in the Prologue in Heaven is a mock-serious personification of the Creative forces of the universe that Goethe identifies with Love. Nature is a backcloth throughout representing the fundamentally beneficent aspects of reality. “

Pasted from <http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/German/TheRestlessSpiritPartII.htm>

Mephisto Finest Walking Shoes….

Mephisto Finest Walking Shoes…..



“Mephisto, Inc. is a manufacturer of shoes and sportswear based in Sarrebourg, France. Founded by designer Martin Michaeli in 1965, the company’s success was founded on its moccasin model. Today Mephisto is a major shoe producer, with more than 2800 employees and 100 million pairs of shoes sold per year. Sales are concentrated in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, but Mephisto has made inroads in the American walking shoe market as well.”


Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mephisto,_Inc.> [now gone]

Mephistopheles is not your name….

Mephistopheles is not your name. “Wrapped Around Your Finger” is from The Police‘s 1983 album Synchronicity.

Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrapped_Around_Your_Finger>




Inspired by Carl Jung’s theory of Synchronicity, it references the German legend of Faust (below). So did Jung, for that matter. Jung called Goethe’s Faust an “alchemical drama.” This paper (Goethe, Faust, Alchemy, and Jung) argues it’s not.

Arthur Koestler, whose book “The Roots of Coincidence” is the link between Sting and Jung, and the inspiration for The Police’s album, hoped for a death not unlike Goethe’s Homunculus’ dissolution into the sea (“with some timid hopes for a de-personalised after-life beyond due confines of space, time and matter and beyond the limits of our comprehension. This ‘oceanic feeling’ has often sustained me at difficult moments, and does so now, while I am writing this” Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Koestler> ).

(Jung’s Synchronicity refers to a meaningful coincidence where the two events are not related. It conjures a higher and invisible relationship. Where a sober person might agree that a coincidence is largely no more than that, a particular metaphysical chill gives even a sober person pause to reflect that perhaps there is more to it in this case.)

“Mephistopheles is not your name
But I know what you’re up to just the same
I will listen hard to your tuition
And you will see it come to it’s fruition”

Pasted from <http://www.sting.com/discography/lyrics/lyric/song/281>

Music video by The Police performing Wrapped Around Your Finger.


Where does the name Mephisto/Mephistopheles (Mephistophilus…

Where does the name Mephisto/Mephistopheles (Mephistophilus, Mephistophilis, Mephostopheles, Mephastophilis and etc.) come from?

It’s an invented name appearing in the first known chapbook. He is not the Devil (Satan/Lucifer).

-In the sixteenth century chapbooks, his name was Mephostophiles.

-In the first English translation by P. F. (Gent.), he is Mephistophilis.

-In Marlowe’s play, he is Mephastophilis in the first printed “A” version of his play (1604), but
Mephostophilis in the second “B” (1616):

The name of Faustus’s constant diabolical companion, inconsistently rendered in the original texts and in many modern editions ( ‘Mephastophilis’ generally in the A-text, ‘Mephostophilis’ in the B-text, but also ‘Mephastophilus’, etc.) should, in our view, be modernised to the standard dictionary form, ‘Mephistopheles’.
(Bevington, David M; Rasmussen, Eric (1962). Doctor Faustus A- and B- texts (1604, 1616): Christopher Marlowe and his collaborator and revisers. Manchester, England: Manchester University Press. p. xi. ISBN 0-7190-1643-6.)

And then:

“Cast no more doubts. Come, Mephistophilis,
And bring glad tidings from great Lucifer ;
Is’t not midnight? come, Mephistophilus,
Veni, veni, Mephistophile ! “

(Pasted from <http://archive.org/stream/tragicalhistoryofdoc00marluoft/tragicalhistoryofdoc00marluoft_djvu.txt> )

In Goethe’s Faust, he is called Mephistopheles. Klaus Mann used “Mephisto.”

His friends call him “Mephisto;” As in: “Hey! Mephisto!” His wife calls him “Muffy.”

According to Wikipedia (2014):

‘The word may derive from the Hebrew mephitz, meaning “distributor”, and tophel, meaning “liar”;
“tophel” is short for tophel shequer, the literal translation of which is “falsehood plasterer”.[1] The name
can also be a combination of three Greek words: “me” as a negation, “phos” meaning light, and “philis”
meaning loving, making it mean “not-light-loving”, possibly parodying the Latin “Lucifer” or “light-
bearer”.’

Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mephistopheles>

Cornelius Agrippa & His Dog….

Cornelius Agrippa & His Dog.

“After Agrippa’s death, rumors circulated about his having summoned demons. In the most famous of these, Agrippa, upon his deathbed, released a black dog which had been his familiar. This black dog resurfaced in various legends about Faustus, and in Goethe’s version became the ‘schwarze Pudel’ Mephistopheles.”

Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Cornelius_Agrippa>

[Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa (1486 – 1535) was a German magician/astrologer/alchemist living at the same time as the historical Faust (approx. 1480 – 1540). The first extant Faust book comes from 1587.]

Marlowe’s Faustus

Marlowe’s Faustus

Faustus. How pliant is this Mephistophilis,
Full of obedience and humility!
Such is the force of magic and my spells.
[Now,] Faustus, thou art conjuror laureat,
Thou canst command great Mephistophilis:

Pasted from <http://www.bartleby.com/19/2/13.html>
Scene III. Marlowe, Christopher. 1909-14. Doctor Faustus. The Harvard Classics

Marlowe’s Mephistophilis

Meph. I am a servant to great Lucifer,
And may not follow thee without his leave
No more than he commands must we perform.

Pasted from <http://www.bartleby.com/19/2/13.html>
Scene III. Marlowe, Christopher. 1909-14. Doctor Faustus. The Harvard Classics